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Being Prepared – have you winterized your pet?

January 16, 2009
By

Yes, there is such a thing as winterizing your pet and making sure they are ready to brave this cold weather.

When taking your pet for a walk can be harmful if chemicals from ice-melting products are ingested by your pet. These products are toxic to our canine/feline family members with problems ranging from sore paws to internal bleeding.

The ASPCA January news alert lists some ways to help minimize and prevent these hidden dangers from threatening your pets health.

After a winter walk or play in the park be sure to remove all ice, salt and ice-melting agents by washing and drying your pet’s feet. Check out PAD WAX or Vaseline which can help to protect your pets paws. Paw wax will help with prevention and healing of sore paws.

Keep a small towel with you when you go on long hikes to clean off paws instead of waiting until you get home.

If your pet does not have a nice winter coat then you can pick up a pet blanket which will help him to keep his body heat and keep his skin from becoming dry while outside. It is important in the winter that you give your dogs fatty acid to help combat dry skin. You can also use Muttluks (boots) to help reduce the contact with chemicals. Another area that you need to be aware of in the winter is cars that are leaking fluids. Anti-freeze is irresistable to canines and though if caught quick the effects can be reversed by your vet – this is a painful slow death for a canine if not caught soon.

If you have long-haired dogs – trim the hair so that you are minimizing the amount of hair exposed to chemicals. In addition, long haired dogs are prone to ice balls forming and clinging to their hair. For our horses, I put a small amount of baby oil on the ends of their tails which helps to keep the ice balls from forming – they are deadly painful if you get whacked with a tail full of ice balls!

These are just a few of the many ways you can help to “winterize” your pet for the winter. More tips to keeping your pet safe and healthy can be found here Top 10 Winter Skin & Paw Care Tips.

If you do spot wounds or redness on your pet’s feet or skin, please contact your veterinarian immediately.

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Being Prepared – have you winterized your pet?

January 16, 2009
By

Yes, there is such a thing as winterizing your pet and making sure they are ready to brave this cold weather.

When taking your pet for a walk can be harmful if chemicals from ice-melting products are ingested by your pet. These products are toxic to our canine/feline family members with problems ranging from sore paws to internal bleeding.

The ASPCA January news alert lists some ways to help minimize and prevent these hidden dangers from threatening your pets health.

After a winter walk or play in the park be sure to remove all ice, salt and ice-melting agents by washing and drying your pet’s feet. Check out PAD WAX or Vaseline which can help to protect your pets paws. Paw wax will help with prevention and healing of sore paws.

Keep a small towel with you when you go on long hikes to clean off paws instead of waiting until you get home.

If your pet does not have a nice winter coat then you can pick up a pet blanket which will help him to keep his body heat and keep his skin from becoming dry while outside. It is important in the winter that you give your dogs fatty acid to help combat dry skin. You can also use Muttluks (boots) to help reduce the contact with chemicals. Another area that you need to be aware of in the winter is cars that are leaking fluids. Anti-freeze is irresistable to canines and though if caught quick the effects can be reversed by your vet – this is a painful slow death for a canine if not caught soon.

If you have long-haired dogs – trim the hair so that you are minimizing the amount of hair exposed to chemicals. In addition, long haired dogs are prone to ice balls forming and clinging to their hair. For our horses, I put a small amount of baby oil on the ends of their tails which helps to keep the ice balls from forming – they are deadly painful if you get whacked with a tail full of ice balls!

These are just a few of the many ways you can help to “winterize” your pet for the winter. More tips to keeping your pet safe and healthy can be found here Top 10 Winter Skin & Paw Care Tips.

If you do spot wounds or redness on your pet’s feet or skin, please contact your veterinarian immediately.

Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



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